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Extract from: Motivations for the ‘Great Migration’ to New England 1628-1640: the Case of the Hercules, March 1634/1635 Diane Thomas

The Hercules sailed from Sandwich to New England in March 1634/5 carrying 102 men, women and   children.  Only fourteen years after the Mayflower, and four years after the founding of Boston, the Hercules made its journey at the start of the second phase of a movement which saw an estimated 20,000 English people emigrate to... Continue Reading →

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LOCAL MOTORCYCLE SPORTING INTEREST: HAWKHURST RESIDENT THOMAS WYNN LOUGHBOROUGH

Thomas Wynn Loughborough is regarded as the founding father of the international governing body of motorcycle sport, the Federation Internationale De Motorcyclisme (the F.I.M.). In 1912, he held the title of Secretary General, until his retirement in 1958, and worked from an office in his house in Hawkhurst, Kent. Born in 1877, he attended Marlborough... Continue Reading →

Motorcycle Trials Competition

From Edwardian times motorcycle manufacturers took an early interest in trials as they wanted to demonstrate their products to the public. The nature of the events, owing to the improving skills of the riders together with the development of machinery, would considerably alter over the years. In early days just to complete the course without... Continue Reading →

All About Wool

This August, the Museum played host to an innovative and interactive exhibition All About Wool that was curated by Hilary Wilkins. It was a  great treat for all who visited and there were many opportunities to try out different skills and to handle the raw materials as well as seeing some of the beautiful garments... Continue Reading →

July news

We have been very lucky as Homewood has lent us some of their pupils' project work. Each pupil in year seven completed a piece of work discussing which monarch should be considered the most significant Tudor. Their responses were wide ranging and there were some very interesting arguments made for each of the monarchs. Mary... Continue Reading →

The Tannery in Tenterden

A couple of weeks ago photographs of the tannery in Tenterden were featured and gained positive responses. Here is a further extract from Gladys Kitney's Memoir of St Michaels in the 1920s and 30s, and an article - unattributed at the moment, but someone might know who wrote it - about the Tanning process. Extracts... Continue Reading →

Dementia Awareness Training

It is the time of year for forget-me-nots. They are the most beautiful flowers and there are many stories that are linked to their naming. They also symbolise faithful love and memories. This beautiful little flower with its mouse like petals has been adopted by the Alzheimer's society as their logo and now, to show that... Continue Reading →

Tenterden’s First Moon Launch

GEORGE (SPIDER) BURNISTON 1927-2017 A keen and popular member of the Tenterden Motorcycle club in the 50’s and 60’s, George had been nicknamed Spider from childhood. His early crawling method of getting about on the coarse coconut matting in the family home by only putting his finger tips and toes in contact with the matting... Continue Reading →

The Spring Offensive

Jim Ferrier was in the Canadian Black Watch and fought in the same battles as men from Tenterden and District. He sent quite detailed letters home to his brother, a policeman, from ‘Somewhere in France’ about his experiences. We do have access to some information about local men and the engagements that they were involved... Continue Reading →

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